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JAYPEE JOURNALS
International Scientific Journals from Jaypee
ISI Impact Factor of 2014-15: 1.710

IndexCopernicus Value: 5.33
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Most Downloaded Articles of the Journal
 
 
List of All Articles
1.  Original Research
A Review of Orthodontic Archwires
Nidhi Malik, Rachna Dubey, Amitabh Kallury, Ankur Chauksye, Trilok Shrivastav, Bhagwat Rao Kapse
[Year:2015] [Month:January-March] [Volume:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:36] [Pages No:6-11] [No of Hits : 1898]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1167 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Today more than hundred years have passed since Dr Edward angle placed his first archwire into a patient’s mouth and orthodontics began. It was during that period many innovations did occur that have been explained in terms of art. As time passed scientifically based orthodontics evolved and we see from that time much new innovation in material science have sum uped with new treatment approach and modalities. However, when we turn around and see the developments and innovations in the material science, we stand with pride: but the urge to make treatment still more comfortable and less time consuming, have led us to the introduction of a plethora of new orthodontic materials and products that represent significant improvement over their predecessors. This article compiles all archwire from angle era till recent available newer archwire.

Keywords: Esthetic archwires, Newer archwires, Teflon coated archwires, Variety of archwires.

How to cite this article: Malik N, Dubey R, Kallury A, Chauksye A, Shrivastav T, Kapse BR. A Review of Orthodontic Archwires. J Orofac Res 2015;5(1):6-11.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
2.  Case Report
Nonsurgical Maxillary Expansion in Adults: Report of Two Cases
Arshad Hussain, Shereen Fatima, Mohammed Haneef
[Year:2015] [Month:October-December] [Volume:5 ] [Number:4] [Pages:51] [Pages No:151-154] [No of Hits : 1446]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1201 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Correction of maxillary transverse discrepancy requires expansion of palate by combination of orthopedic and orthodontic movements. Isolated maxillary transverse deficiency can be treated either orthodontically or surgically with assisted rapid maxillary expansion (RME).
Nonsurgical expansion modalities include rapid maxillary expansion and slow maxillary expansion. Haas popularized the idea of orthodontic palatal expansion in the 1960s, and since then transverse deficiencies have been treated successfully in children and adolescents.
The use of palatal expanders in adults was widely frowned upon and was generally considered to be unsuccessful. Handelman published a clinical review in 1997, proving a nonsurgical expansion in adults was possible.

Keywords: Nonsurgical maxillary expansion, Palatal expansion, Rapid maxillary expansion.

How to cite this article: Hussain A, Fatima S, Haneef M. Nonsurgical Maxillary Expansion in Adults: Report of Two Cases. J Orofac Res 2015;5(4):151-154.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
3.  Review Article
Dental Smart Materials
Manali Tiwari, Sanjeev Tyagi, Mukta Nigam, Mudita Rawal, Sangeeta Meena, Abhishek Choudhary
[Year:2015] [Month:October-December] [Volume:5 ] [Number:4] [Pages:51] [Pages No:125-129] [No of Hits : 1051]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1195 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Dental materials are stable and have greater durability if they do not react with the environment and remain passive. At the same time, it is hoped that the materials will be well accepted and will cause neither harm nor injury. This is an entirely negative approach to material tolerance and biocompatibility. This outlook hides the possibility through which positive gains can be achieved by using materials that behave in a more dynamic fashion in the environment in which they are placed. The current dental materials are improvised. The use of smart materials has made a great revolution in dentistry, which includes the use of restorative materials, such as smart composites, smart ceramics, compomers, resin-modified glass ionomer, amorphous calcium phosphate-releasing pit, and fissure sealants and other materials, such as orthodontic shape memory alloys, smart burs, etc.

Keywords: Biosmart dentistry, Fluoride release, Smart materials.

How to cite this article: Tiwari M, Tyagi S, Nigam M, Rawal M, Meena S, Choudhary A. Dental Smart Materials. J Orofac Res 2015;5(4):125-129.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
4.  Original Research
A Comparative Evaluation of Comma-shaped Incision with Standard Incision in Mandibular Third Molar Surgery: A Clinical Study
Zameer Pasha, Zuber Ahmed Naqvi, Saleem Shaikh, Nazia Khan
[Year:2015] [Month:January-March] [Volume:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:36] [Pages No:12-17] [No of Hits : 637]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1168 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Many series of side effects will be produced with the extraction of impacted lower third molar which including pain, swelling, inflammation, and trismus. Flap design is important to allow good visibility, reach to the impacted tooth, and for healing of the surgically created defect. This study aims at the evaluation and comparison of standard flap design with comma type of flap design used in the surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molar and to objectively evaluate the merits and demerits of individual flap design.

Study design: In this study, 200 patients with bilateral mandibular third molars impaction of age group of 18 to 30 years were selected for the study, To reflect the mucoperiosteal flap on one side standard incision and on other side comma incision were used and, after which the steps are common in the removal of impacted third molars. Immediately on the postoperative days 1, 3 and 7, the postoperative parameters (pain, swelling and mouth opening were recorded. And periodontal status were recorded preoperatively, 1st month and 2nd month respectively.

Results and conclusion: The pain and swelling scores were found to be significantly lower in the surgical area with comma incisions which was recorded on days 1, 3 and 7 as compared to the area where standard incisions were made. In mouth opening, there was a sufficiently great difference seen between the two incisions on first postoperative day, but though there was clinical difference between the two incisions on day 3 and 7 there was no statistical significance.
The results of the study shows no lingual nerve paresthesia or any other morbidity hence, the new incision design should probably be made the conventional method, considering the less degree of postoperative complications encountered. although it may require some practice initially.

Clinical implications: Third molar impactions are common and usually associated with postoperative complications, like pain, swelling, trismus and pocket formation. Incision and flap design is important in healing wound and minimizing postoperative complications. Comma incision design has shown less postoperative complication in compare to standard incision

Keywords: Comma incision, Disimpaction, Mandibular Impaction, Standard incision, Visual analog scale.

How to cite this article: Pasha Z, Naqvi ZA, Shaikh S, Khan N. A Comparative Evaluation of Comma-shaped Incision with Standard Incision in Mandibular Third Molar Surgery: A Clinical Study. J Orofac Res 2015;5(1):12-17.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
5.  Review Article
Bioactive Materials: A Short Review
Medha Bhushan, Sanjeev Tyagi, Mukta Nigam, Abhishek Choudhary, Nishant Khurana, Vartul Dwivedi
[Year:2015] [Month:October-December] [Volume:5 ] [Number:4] [Pages:51] [Pages No:138-141] [No of Hits : 595]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1198 | FREE

ABSTRACT

In every field of dentistry and medicine, bioactive materials have been widely used. These materials are used for regeneration, repair, and reconstruction in the field of conservative dentistry and endodontics. These materials are used in different forms and composition and act directly on vital tissue, helping in its healing and repair. These materials directly function because of induction of various growth factors and different cells. This article summarizes the types and uses of bioactive materials.

Keywords: Bioactive materials, Biomimetic materials, Glass transition temperature.

How to cite this article: Bhushan M, Tyagi S, Nigam M, Choudhary A, Khurana N, Dwivedi V. Bioactive Materials: A Short Review. J Orofac Res 2015;5(4):138-141.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
6.  Case Report
Rare Case of Buccal Exostosis in Edentulous Mandibular Body Region
Amita Rani, Rajni Poswal
[Year:2015] [Month:April-June] [Volume:5 ] [Number:2] [Pages:34] [Pages No:65-67] [No of Hits : 505]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1182 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Buccal exostoses are benign, broad-based surface masses of the facial aspect of the maxilla and less commonly, the mandible. It is believed that this is one way, bone responds to stresses applied to it. They begin to develop in the early adulthood and may slowly enlarge over the years. To the best of our knowledge, it is the second reported case of single buccal exostosis in mandibular molar region and first of its kind in edentulous mandible. The following paper presents a very rare and unique case of buccal-sided mandibular molar exostosis in an edentulous mandible of an old female and its surgical management.

Keywords: Buccal exostosis, Edentulous mandible, Torus mandibularis.

How to cite this article: Rani A, Poswal R. Rare Case of Buccal Exostosis in Edentulous Mandibular Body Region. J Orofac Res 2015;5(2):65-67.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
7.  Review Article
Ayurvedic Herbs in Dentistry: Learn How to Manage Oral Health and Tooth Decay with these Modest Herbs?
Rajeshwar Digra, NC Rao, Nidhi Gupta, Shelja Vasi
[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:66] [Pages No:41-45] [No of Hits : 2632]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1125 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Herbal medicines have been used for many years. Their history can be rooted from ancient civilization wherein their role as a primary source of medication is evident. Many people are looking for a natural approach for caring for teeth after becoming disillusioned with the side effects of modern methods. Despite the advances in various field of medicine, oral infections and dental caries are still considered as serious public health problems and inflict a major burden to health care services around the world and especially in developing countries. Development of resistance against antibiotics and antiseptics is a growing cause of concern which have limited the preventive measures. Therefore, there is a continuing need to search for new antimicrobial agents. Ayurveda has been used for more than five thousand years and has many applications in improving dental health. Ayurveda gives natural ways to prevent and treat oral disease. In rural India, dental care usually not accessible instantly and even not affordable to them but there are so many ayurvedic remedies which they come across in day to day life. The basic idea is that with the help of this article, people will know about the use of various ayurvedic home remedies for oral health and disease, it will encourage the people to maintain their oral health and prevent them from oral disease.

Keywords: Ayurveda, Herbal medicines, Aloe vera, Turmeric, Chewing sticks, Glycyrrhiza glabra.

How to cite this article: Digra R, Rao NC, Gupta N, Vasi S. Ayurvedic Herbs in Dentistry: Learn How to Manage Oral Health and Tooth Decay with these Modest Herbs? J Orofac Res 2014;4(1):41-45.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest:None declared

 
8.  Case Report
Gingival Melanin Depigmentation: A Review and Case Report
Sumedha Srivastava, Trilok Shrivastava, Shivani Dwivedi, Pramod Yadav
[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:66] [Pages No:50-54] [No of Hits : 2316]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1127 | FREE

ABSTRACT

The color of the gingiva has a tremendous impact on the esthetics of the smile. Clinically gingival melanin hyper pigmentation is presented as ‘black gum’ which is a common esthetic problem especially for those who have gummy smile. Several attempts have been made for removal of gingival pigmentation by different techniques. Each technique had its own supremacy in efficiency and also draw back. In the present cases, an effort has been made to assess the procedure of melanin depigmentation using surgical scalpel technique.

Keywords: Melanin, Depigmentation, Gingiva, Melanocytes.

How to cite this article: Srivastava S, Shrivastava T, Dwivedi S, Yadav P. Gingival Melanin Depigmentation: A Review and Case Report. J Orofac Res 2014;4(1):50-54.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest:None declared

 
9.  Review Article
Defense Mechanisms of Gingiva
Eshan Verma, Apurv Jhawar
[Year:2014] [Month:April-June] [Volume:4 ] [Number:2] [Pages:60] [Pages No:111-114] [No of Hits : 2133]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1138 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Defense is resisting an attack; there are numerous protective mechanisms that work in the oral cavity against various insults. Gingiva is constantly subjected to a wide array of mechanical, chemical and antigenic challenges-some of which are transient and others permanent. This review will discuss how the gingiva prepares and safeguards itself via diverse defense mechanisms in the face of this challenging environment.

Keywords: Gingival defense mechanism, Protective mechanisms in gingiva, Gingival crevicular fluid.

How to cite this article: Verma E, Jhawar A. Defense Mechanisms of Gingiva. J Orofac Res 2014;4(2):111-114.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
10.  Review Article
Orthodontic Camouflage in Skeletal Class III Malocclusion: A Contemporary Review
Pawankumar Dnyandeo Tekale, Ketan K Vakil, Jeegar K Vakil, Sameer Madhukarrao Parhad
[Year:2014] [Month:April-June] [Volume:4 ] [Number:2] [Pages:60] [Pages No:98-102] [No of Hits : 2089]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10026-1136 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Early orthopedic intervention can be effective in normalizing skeletal class III malocclusions if patients are treated in a timely manner. There are a large number of skeletal class III patients that either decline or cannot afford surgical treatment. The only alternative is ‘Orthodontic camouflage’ through comprehensive treatment with fixed appliances. The ultimate judgment as to whether orthodontic treatment alone, to camouflage a skeletal problem, would be an acceptable result, or whether orthognathic surgery to correct the jaw discrepancy would be required, must be made by the patient and parents. Class III camouflage logically would be the reverse of class II camouflage, based on retracting the lower incisors, advancing the upper incisors, and surgically reducing the prominence of the chin, in addition, rotating the mandible downward and backward, when the chin is prominent, can be considered a form of camouflage. Even though timing of orthodontic treatment has always been somewhat controversial, it is an agreement in the literature that prognosis is still obscure until growth is completed. A cephalometric analysis is needed to quantitatively record the severity of the class III malocclusion and to determine the underlying cause of the deformity. Although it is agreed that camouflage line of treatment is not an ideal line of treatment, but it serves its purpose very well in mild range of skeletal dysplasia’s and in conditions where patient is either unwilling for orthognathic surgery or in cases were surgery is contraindicated.

Keywords: Orthodontic camouflage, Skeletal Class III, Adult treatment.

How to cite this article: Tekale PD, Vakil KK, Vakil JK, Parhad SM. Orthodontic Camouflage in Skeletal Class III Malocclusion: A Contemporary Review. J Orofac Res 2014;4(2):98-102.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
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